The iodine clock reaction is a classical chemical clock demonstration experiment to display chemical kinetics in action; it was discovered by Hans Heinrich Landolt in 1886.The iodine clock reaction exists in several variations, which each involve iodine species (iodide ion, free iodine, or iodate ion) and redox reagents in the presence of starch. Two colourless solutions are mixed and at first there is no visible reaction. After a short time delay, the liquid suddenly turns to a shade of dark blue due to the formation of a triiodide-starch complex. In some variations, the solution will repeatedly cycle from colorless to blue and back to colorless, until the reagents are depleted.


Hydrogen peroxide variation
This method starts with a solution of hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid. To this a solution containing potassium iodide, sodium thiosulfate, and starch is added. There are two reactions occurring simultaneously in the solution.

In the first, slow reaction, iodine is produced:

H2O2 + 2I− + 2H+ → I2+ 2H2O

In the second, fast reaction, iodine is reconverted to 2 iodide ions by the thiosulfate:

2S2O32− + I2 → S4O62− + 2I−

After some time the solution always changes color to a very dark blue, almost black.

When the solutions are mixed, the second reaction causes the iodine to be consumed much faster than it is generated, and only a small amount of iodine is present in the dynamic equilibrium. Once the thiosulfate ion has been exhausted, this reaction stops and the blue colour caused by the iodide – starch complex appears.

Anything that accelerates the first reaction will shorten the time until the solution changes color. Decreasing the pH (increasing H+ concentration), or increasing the concentration of iodide or hydrogen peroxide will shorten the time. Adding more thiosulfate will have the opposite effect; it will take longer for the blue colour to appear.

Iodine clock reaction

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The iodine clock reaction is a classical chemical clock demonstration experiment to display chemical kinetics in action; it was discovered by Hans Heinrich Landolt in 1886.The iodine clock reaction exists in several variations, which each involve iodine species (iodide ion, free iodine, or iodate ion) and redox reagents in the presence of starch. Two colourless solutions are mixed and at first there is no visible reaction. After a short time delay, the liquid suddenly turns to a shade of dark blue due to the formation of a triiodide-starch complex. In some variations, the solution will repeatedly cycle from colorless to blue and back to colorless, until the reagents are depleted.


Hydrogen peroxide variation
This method starts with a solution of hydrogen peroxide and sulfuric acid. To this a solution containing potassium iodide, sodium thiosulfate, and starch is added. There are two reactions occurring simultaneously in the solution.

In the first, slow reaction, iodine is produced:

H2O2 + 2I− + 2H+ → I2+ 2H2O

In the second, fast reaction, iodine is reconverted to 2 iodide ions by the thiosulfate:

2S2O32− + I2 → S4O62− + 2I−

After some time the solution always changes color to a very dark blue, almost black.

When the solutions are mixed, the second reaction causes the iodine to be consumed much faster than it is generated, and only a small amount of iodine is present in the dynamic equilibrium. Once the thiosulfate ion has been exhausted, this reaction stops and the blue colour caused by the iodide – starch complex appears.

Anything that accelerates the first reaction will shorten the time until the solution changes color. Decreasing the pH (increasing H+ concentration), or increasing the concentration of iodide or hydrogen peroxide will shorten the time. Adding more thiosulfate will have the opposite effect; it will take longer for the blue colour to appear.

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